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Friday, May 27, 2016

Colorado Westernaires to perform at Marcus Fair

Tuesday, August 5, 2008

(Photo)
The Westernaires, popular horse riders' group, has consented to appear at the Marcus Fair on Saturday, Aug. 9, at 1 p.m. The group will also participate in the fair parade at 4 p.m. that day, and perform again at the Marcus Horse Arena that evening at 8:30 p.m.

It promises to be an exciting event to see for horse lover's of all ages. The Marcus Fair Association was thrilled that one of their own residents, Nancy Hier, approached the group's director last year about the possibility of them performing at the Marcus arena. It has been an on-going effort by numerous folks to make it a headline event for the fair.

The organization has around 1,000 members with adults volunteering their time and support. In its 60 years of existence, the group has only had two directors. The founder was E.E. Wyland and the current director is Glen Keller, Jr.

Each division contains many training teams managed by instructors and monitors. The many managers are in charge of wardrobe department, building and grounds and maintenance, harness and driving teams, the kitchen, store and library, the museum, public relations, membership, show scheduling and planning, truck maintenance and driving, horse wrangling and supply, print shop for communications and training materials Volunteers make the whole program work with many being parents of the the riders.

All instructors are trained in an intensive program annually. These volunteers devote many hours to make the program the success that it is. Similar credits go to those maintaining the fleet of semi-trucks and buses used each year.

The group is self-supporting, relying on income from nominal fees and ticket sales to their performances. They travel throughout Western United States and Canada. They perform near Golden, Colorado at Fort Westernaire which includes an expanded Museum of Riding and /Driving History.

Their roots trace back to Jefferson County, Colo., a largely rural area and sparsely settled suburbs adjacent to Denver. The youngsters range in age from 9 to 19. Some rent out their horses while others have their own horse to ride.

Every rider belongs to a base team. To achieve the "top" team, each rider must follow a course of training, beginning in the first year as a Tenderfoot rider, Blue division. This year is devoted solely to teaching equitation, horse care and the basic maneuvers. The next step is the White division that takes the rider through several years of increasingly complex mounted drills. The promotions committee determines when the rider is qualified, by age and ability, to be promoted into the Red division or the performing division.

Within the red division, each rider must move through two more increasingly difficult teams before reaching the red team to go out and perform. Practice occurs each Saturday, year around for the red division and every other Saturday for the blue and white divisions.

Westernaires have performed in some of the most famous arenas with people coming from miles around to see them. The group has some standing dates while others may be new each year.

Hier has recruited ladies from the local churches to assist in serving meals. Thursday evening, the fair board will hoat a welcome meal at the MMC building with Dean Drefke and Lenny Dreckman in charge. Mayor Darrel Downs will greet them. Friday's breakfast will also be served at the school, Friday's noon meal will be handled at the church stand at the fair and the evening meal will be held at Hiers with Cherokee County Cattlemen grilling steaks.

Saturday morning's meal will be at the school again and lunch will be served at the Mt. Pleasant Church on the fairgrounds. The group will dine at the Pizza Ranch Friday night. Sunday morning the group wil eat pancakes cooked by the local Boy Scout Troop at the community center. They'll find plenty of food at the fair stands and eat many burgers at Sunday evenings' Lions Club feed. A breakfast will be packed in coolers for them to eat on their way to Colorado.

Some of their parents are coming as well along with drivers of semis and buses, Volunteers will be there to oversee the horse care.

It has taken a lot of coordination to make sure the fair has the funds to cover their transportation costs and see that needs will also be taken care of. This a truly is a special crowd pleaser and many will fill the bleachers as there has been no such talented group around this area. Make it a point to check this out. Remember, entrance to the event is free.Colorado Westernaires perform in Marcus

By Nancy Hohbach

Correspondent

This popular horse riders' group has consented to appear at the Marcus Fair on Saturday, Aug. 9, at 1 p.m., will participate in the fair parade at 4 p.m. and perform again at the Marcus Horse Arena that evening at 8:30 p.m.

It promises to be an exciting event to see for horse lover's of all ages. The Marcus Fair Association was thrilled that one of their own residents, Nancy Hier, approached the group's director last year about the possibility of them performing at the Marcus arena. It has been an on-going effort by numerous folks to make it a headline event for the fair.

The organization has around 1,000 members with adults volunteering their time and support. In its 60 years of existence, the group has only had two directors. The founder was E.E. Wyland and the current director is Glen Keller, Jr.

Each division contains many training teams managed by instructors and monitors. The many managers are in charge of wardrobe department, building and grounds and maintenance, harness and driving teams, the kitchen, store and library, the museum, public relations, membership, show scheduling and planning, truck maintenance and driving, horse wrangling and supply, print shop for communications and training materials Volunteers make the whole program work with many being parents of the the riders.

All instructors are trained in an intensive program annually. These volunteers devote many hours to make the program the success that it is. Similar credits go to those maintaining the fleet of semi-trucks and buses used each year.

The group is self-supporting, relying on income from nominal fees and ticket sales to their performances. They travel throughout Western United States and Canada. They perform near Golden, Colorado at Fort Westernaire which includes an expanded Museum of Riding and /Driving History.

Their roots trace back to Jefferson County, Colo., a largely rural area and sparsely settled suburbs adjacent to Denver. The youngsters range in age from 9 to 19. Some rent out their horses while others have their own horse to ride.

Every rider belongs to a base team. To achieve the "top" team, each rider must follow a course of training, beginning in the first year as a Tenderfoot rider, Blue division. This year is devoted solely to teaching equitation, horse care and the basic maneuvers. The next step is the White division that takes the rider through several years of increasingly complex mounted drills. The promotions committee determines when the rider is qualified, by age and ability, to be promoted into the Red division or the performing division.

Within the red division, each rider must move through two more increasingly difficult teams before reaching the red team to go out and perform. Practice occurs each Saturday, year around for the red division and every other Saturday for the blue and white divisions.

Westernaires have performed in some of the most famous arenas with people coming from miles around to see them. The group has some standing dates while others may be new each year.

Hier has recruited ladies from the local churches to assist in serving meals. Thursday evening, the fair board will hoat a welcome meal at the MMC building with Dean Drefke and Lenny Dreckman in charge. Mayor Darrel Downs will greet them. Friday's breakfast will also be served at the school, Friday's noon meal will be handled at the church stand at the fair and the evening meal will be held at Hiers with Cherokee County Cattlemen grilling steaks.

Saturday morning's meal will be at the school again and lunch will be served at the Mt. Pleasant Church on the fairgrounds. The group will dine at the Pizza Ranch Friday night. Sunday morning the group wil eat pancakes cooked by the local Boy Scout Troop at the community center. They'll find plenty of food at the fair stands and eat many burgers at Sunday evenings' Lions Club feed. A breakfast will be packed in coolers for them to eat on their way back home to Colorado.

Some of their parents are coming as well along with drivers of semis and buses, Volunteers will be there to oversee the horse care.

It has taken a lot of coordination to make sure the fair has the funds to cover their transportation costs and see that needs will also be taken care of. This a truly is a special crowd pleaser and many will fill the bleachers as there has been no such talented group around this area. Make it a point to check this out. Remember, entrance to the event is free.



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