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Saturday, Apr. 30, 2016

Making a mark in downtown

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

(Photo)
Paula Burch (center), owner of Paula Hair Design was recently presented a plaque marking her building as one of the buildings listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. Presenting the plaque are Steve Schroeder (left) and Jim Adamson. Photo by Ken Ross
The Cherokee Historical Preservation Commission (CHPC) recently presented Paula Burch, owner of Paula Hair Design, with an historical plaque that lists her property at 112 S. Second St. on the National Registry of Historic Places.

As it stands there are 73 business in Cherokee listed on the National Registry of Historical Places. There are 54 buildings that are listed as contributing (buildings that are still recognizable) and 19 that are listed as not contributing.

The City Assessor dates the building to 1906 and it was constructed in two phases. The original building consisted of the front half of the present first story. The later second story addition was incorporated in the fall of 1925 and extended the building back 26 feet, doubling its length.

Its utilitarian fašade design reflects its post-WWI construction date. Prior to the 1906 date, the Sanborn Fire Insurance Map listed a small frame dwelling at this location dating back to 1883. The Key State Telephone Company constructed the small office building in 1906,

According to Jim Adamson, Chairman of the CHPC, the CHPC has presented 14 plaques in all to help mark the historical buildings in the downtown area. Not all the plaques are displayed outside and Adamson will be talking to other downtown business owners to see if they would like to participate.

Members of the CHPC are Jim Adamson, Mick Samsel, Dwight Varce, Dee Gee Blair and Jean Cook.

The downtown historical district consists of a somewhat irregular rectangular area that straddles Main Street and Maple Street, between First Street on the east and includes a few properties just to the west of Fifth Street, and a handful of buildings on Willow Street.



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