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Wednesday, July 29, 2015

2009 Fireworks Safety Fact Sheet

Thursday, July 2, 2009

*Fireworks devices were involved in an estimated 9,800 injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms in 2007, based on the 2008 Fireworks Annual Report from the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
*An estimated 6,300 injuries were treated in hospital emergency rooms during the one-month period surrounding the Fourth of July (June 22-July 22).

The following data is from the 6,300 estimates:

*Injuries to children were a major component of total fireworks-related injuries with children under 15 accounting for 42 percent of the estimated injuries.
*Children and young adults under 20 had 54 percent of the estimated injuries.
*Among different types of fireworks, sparklers were associated with the greatest number of estimated injuries at 1,100. Firecrackers and rockets were associated with 1,000 and 900 injuries each, respectively.
*Sparklers accounted for half of the injuries to children less than 5 years of age.
*The parts of the body most often injured were hands (estimated 2,000 injuries), eyes (1,400 injuries) and the legs (1,200 injuries).
*More than half of the injuries were burns. Burns were the most common injury to all parts of the body except the eyes, where contusions, lacerations and foreign bodies in the eye occurred more frequently.
*Males accounted for 70 percent of fireworks injuries.
*The best defense against kids suffering severe eye injuries and burns is to not let kids play with any fireworks.
*Do not purchase, use or store fireworks of any type. Protect yourself, your family and your friends by avoiding fireworks. Attend only authorized public fireworks displays conducted by licensed operators, but be aware that even professional displays can be dangerous.
*Prevent Blindness America supports the development and enforcement of bans on the importation, sale and use of all fireworks, except those used in authorized public displays by licensed operators, as the only effective means of eliminating the social and economic impact of fireworks-related trauma and damage.

Other Firework Statistics

*In 2006, nine out of ten emergency room fireworks injuries involved fireworks that Federal regulations permit consumers to use, according to the National Fire Protection Association. "Safe and sane" fireworks caused more injuries than illegal fireworks, especially to preschool children.

According to the American Pyrotechnics Association:

*Consumer Fireworks (formerly known as "Class C" Fireworks) - Also known as 1.4G Fireworks. These devices are most commonly sold at neighborhood stands during the Fourth of July season.
*Display Fireworks (formerly known as "Class B" Fireworks) - Also known as 1.3G Fireworks. These are the fireworks used in large community displays run by licensed professionals (pyrotechnicians). These devices are not intended for use by consumers.
*The legal limit of explosive material in a consumer (1.4G or Class C) firework is 50 mg (about the size of half an aspirin tablet). Any item containing more than 50 mg is illegal and should be avoided.
*Fireworks devices were involved in an estimated 9,800 injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms in 2007, based on the 2008 Fireworks Annual Report from the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
*An estimated 6,300 injuries were treated in hospital emergency rooms during the one-month period surrounding the Fourth of July (June 22-July 22).

The following data is from the 6,300 estimates:

*Injuries to children were a major component of total fireworks-related injuries with children under 15 accounting for 42 percent of the estimated injuries.
*Children and young adults under 20 had 54 percent of the estimated injuries.
*Among different types of fireworks, sparklers were associated with the greatest number of estimated injuries at 1,100. Firecrackers and rockets were associated with 1,000 and 900 injuries each, respectively.
*Sparklers accounted for half of the injuries to children less than 5 years of age.
*The parts of the body most often injured were hands (estimated 2,000 injuries), eyes (1,400 injuries) and the legs (1,200 injuries).
*More than half of the injuries were burns. Burns were the most common injury to all parts of the body except the eyes, where contusions, lacerations and foreign bodies in the eye occurred more frequently.
*Males accounted for 70 percent of fireworks injuries.
*The best defense against kids suffering severe eye injuries and burns is to not let kids play with any fireworks.
*Do not purchase, use or store fireworks of any type. Protect yourself, your family and your friends by avoiding fireworks. Attend only authorized public fireworks displays conducted by licensed operators, but be aware that even professional displays can be dangerous.
*Prevent Blindness America supports the development and enforcement of bans on the importation, sale and use of all fireworks, except those used in authorized public displays by licensed operators, as the only effective means of eliminating the social and economic impact of fireworks-related trauma and damage.

Other Firework Statistics

*In 2006, nine out of ten emergency room fireworks injuries involved fireworks that Federal regulations permit consumers to use, according to the National Fire Protection Association. "Safe and sane" fireworks caused more injuries than illegal fireworks, especially to preschool children.

According to the American Pyrotechnics Association:

*Consumer Fireworks (formerly known as "Class C" Fireworks) - Also known as 1.4G Fireworks. These devices are most commonly sold at neighborhood stands during the Fourth of July season.
*Display Fireworks (formerly known as "Class B" Fireworks) - Also known as 1.3G Fireworks. These are the fireworks used in large community displays run by licensed professionals (pyrotechnicians). These devices are not intended for use by consumers.
*The legal limit of explosive material in a consumer (1.4G or Class C) firework is 50 mg (about the size of half an aspirin tablet). Any item containing more than 50 mg is illegal and should be avoided.



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