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Times Gone By

Friday, August 5, 2011

100 years ago

(Photo)
City living - This is an early photo of George Johnson's home, located on West Willow, before it was remodeled. This home is a perfect example of the grandeur that was part of early Cherokee.
On the 29th ult. the Postal Savings department became an established fact in Cherokee, but as the postmaster is forbidden to give out any information regarding depositors and deposits a vacant stare and I-don't-understand expression is all this reporter could get in the way of information. However, we can vouch that the department is doing business, for we saw with our own eyes a savings card on which was affixed a ten cent savings stamp. If in the course of time he can save enough to affix nine more he may become the proud possessor of a savings certificate and a creditor of this great nation just like any other bond holding plutocrat and when he becomes creditor to the extent of $20 he may become a bond holder in fact and Uncle Same will pay him 2 percent interest and will do it semi-annually, too.

Before one can open an account a family history or something like that must be given the postmaster, the depositor must sign his name in duplicate. You can deposit all you want to, the regulations saying:

"The name of the depositor, the number of his account, the date of issue, the name of the depository office, and the date on which interest begins. The postmaster or his representative will make out a duplicate of each certificate issued, which the depositor will be required to sign and which the postmaster will retain in his records.

No account may be opened for less than one dollar, nor will fractions of a dollar be accepted for deposit.

No person is permitted to deposit more than $100 in any one calendar month nor to have a total balance to his credit at one time of more than $500 inclusive of accumulated interest.

Savings certificates cannot be transferred or negotiated and will be payable only to the person to whom issued.

On opening an account a depositor is supplied with an envelope in which he may keep his savings certificates.

On this envelope is printed information for his guidance, and also a blank ledger record on which to keep an account of his deposits and withdrawals.

In case a savings certificate is lost or destroyed the depositor should notify the postmaster. If deemed proper a new certificate will be issued upon compliance by the depositor with the necessary requirements.

Postmasters are not permitted to receive savings certificates for safekeeping."

75 years ago

Cherokee city officials were awaiting word from Henry Kolln, Sheldon wrestler, Wednesday afternoon in regard to what charges he intends filing against Robert Adams, Cherokee, for injuries received in the professional wrestling show suddenly terminated here Monday night.

Adams was lodged in city jail after planting a running kick square in Kolln's face while the latter was wrapping a towel, an old "pro" wrestling trick, around the neck of Walt O'Conner, Carroll, his opponent. Several stitches were required to close the gash in Kolln's face and lip and his five teeth bridge plate was ruined in addition to the teeth it was attached to being loosened.


Fire believed caused by spontaneous combustion destroyed more than 2,000 bushels of grain and caused damaged estimated at $2,000 above insurance carried on buildings at the Albert B. Jorgensen farm eight miles east of Cherokee Tuesday afternoon.

Neighbors gathered to fight the fire but water had to be hauled and the Aurelia fire department was called. They were able to put out the fire that spread to the hog house, cattle and machine sheds but were unable to save the large barn and double corn crib and granary in which the grain had been stored.

Crops lost included 1,000 bushels of corn, 1,000 bushels of oats, 600 bushels of barley and 15 tons of tame hay. Some of the oats and barley may be 75 years ago

Kolln Expected To File Charge In Kicking Case

Robert Adams Still Held in Cherokee Jail.

Cherokee city officials were awaiting word from Henry Kolln, Sheldon wrestler, Wednesday afternoon in regard to what charges he intends filing against Robert Adams, Cherokee, for injuries received in the professional wrestling show suddenly terminated here Monday night.

Adams was lodged in city jail after planting a running kick square in Kolln's face while the latter was wrapping a towel, an old "pro" wrestling trick, around the neck of Walt O'Conner, Carroll, his opponent. Several stitches were required to close the gash in Kolln's face and lip and his five teeth bridge plate was ruined in addition to the teeth it was attached to being loosened.


Fire believed caused by spontaneous combustion destroyed more than 2,000 bushels of grain and caused damaged estimated at $2,000 above insurance carried on buildings at the Albert B. Jorgensen farm eight miles east of Cherokee Tuesday afternoon.

Neighbors gathered to fight the fire but water had to be hauled and the Aurelia fire department was called. They were able to put out the fire that spread to the hog house, cattle and machine sheds but were unable to save the large barn and double corn crib and granary in which the grain had been stored.

Crops lost included 1,000 bushels of corn, 1,000 bushels of oats, 600 bushels of barley and 15 tons of tame hay. Some of the oats and barley may be salvaged but this is still indefinite.

50 years ago

A "shocked" 14-year-old Douglas Sims held reign to the grand champion baby beef, a 950-pound white face Hereford, when final results from the judges were announced here Friday afternoon.

Reserve champion of the Cherokee County Fair went to Mary Cronin a 16-year-old Remsen lass. The girl, a Jolly Junior 4-H'er, won reserve champion honors in the Angus division here and in Omaha last year. Simons also showed the grand champion market heifer here last year and won second place Ak-Sar-Ben.

While Doug was still recovering from the shock of his first baby beef grand champion, other major activities moved ahead for the final day.

The largest crowd of the Fair attended last night. In preparation for the final day everything was keyed to a high pitch.

(Photo)
County living - No information is available for this photograph but it shows the simple living that many of the early settlers endured while fulfilling their dreams.
Girls 4-H exhibits went on display for the final time at 8 o'clock Saturday morning.

Highlight of the morning's activities was the livestock sale which got underway at 9 a.m. in the cattle ring.

The afternoon program was off to a fast start with the first Cavaliers open class horse show.

A high amount of interest has been shown in the newly-formed horse club.

The club was inaugurated early this year and enrollment had to be closed because of an overload of members.

Many 4-H and FFA members showed a considerable droop this afternoon as they bid a final farewell to the animals they lived so close to for the past year.

Twin features of tonight's program will be the announcement of the 1961 Fair Queen who will reign until next year's fair. One of the 21 entries will be crowned by the 1960 queen of the Cherokee County Fair Miss Alice Carison.

On stage at 8:15 the Cherokee Community Theatre will present two old time one-act melodramas. Theatre officials said this is the first timein 20 yeas that a community here has presented plays of this type. Two which are to be presented are: "He Done Her Wrong or Wedded But No Wife" and "He Ain't Done Right By Nell."

Young Simsons said he had not decided where to show his Herford grand

"Ham Operator"

The victory, as sweet as it was, may have been a "shock" for the quite spiken lad but it didn't change his mind about a "hobble career."

That hobby-to-be, the Marcus boys hopes, will be in electronics or as a "ham" radio operator.

Doug is one of five children. He has three younger sisters and one brother. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Simons who farm a half section 4 miles south of Marcus on Highway 143.

Doug has been active in 4-H for six years and was club reporter for the Tilden Tillers last year.

Doug's Hereford was also selected as breed champion. Reserve breed champion went to Charles Simons who is also a member of the Tilden Tillers and county 4-H president.

Miss Cronin won grand champion honors in the angus breed division. Larry Shafer, Cleghorn, a member of the Liberty Leaders, had reserve champion angus.

In the Shorthorn division Eldon Meissner, Peirson, won grand champion honors. Meissener is a member of the Grand Meadow Future Feeders. Sheridan Sure Shooter Charles Johnson of Marcus was awarded reserve champion of the Shorthorn division.

25 years ago

For about three years, Cherokee County officials have been working with the Office of the State Archeologist (OSA) and the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) in trying to get the archeological surveys of the Mill Creek Bridge site completed. The time and money spent on the surveys has created a lot of frustration among county officials.

The third and final survey was recently completed. The survey showed that the site was inhabited by at least three tribes of prehistoric Indians. However, the survey also showed that the Mill Creek site had little significant archeological value because the soil had been mixed up through past use.

These findings have added to the frustration because the second survey, done by the OAS, had indicated that the site could have some historical value. Results from that second survey report led to a recommendation from SHPO for the third survey.

The Cherokee County Board of Supervisors and county engineer Bill Bennett had planned to air their frustrations at a Legislative Rules Committee hearing Aug. 19 in Des Moines.

However, during a lengthy discussion at the board's Monday meeting, the value of attending the hearing was questioned.

After discussion, the board decided to postpone the hearing until the final report on the recently completed archeological survey is prepared. The final report is expected in early October.

The board's decision came about after a discussion with Bennett and Terry Walker, director of the Sanford Museum and one of the people involved in the final dig of the Mill Creek site.

Bennett and Walker said they felt the board should not attend the hearing because it could turn into a yelling match, and, subsequently, cause more problems than it could solve.

However, supervisor Jack Foresman said the county should go through the hearing so the other county officials and state legislatures would know about the problems that arise when counties have to deal with OAS and SHPO procedures.

"We still want to be damn sure that this kind of thing is not going to be happening again," Foresman said.

Walker said many of the problems may already be solved partly because of complaints from the county, and partly because of staff changes.

"There are a lot of changes being made, most of them for the good. I don't think this hearing will add anything to what has already taken place," Walker said.

SHPO officials are now making on-site examinations of archeological digs before accepting Phase II reports from archeologists, Walker said. Phase II refers to second surveys of archeological sites. In the past, SHPO officials would base their recommendations only on the written reports.

Also, the two head archeologists with the OAS are leaving their jobs, Walker said. Subsequently, any complaints the county might have about their work would not do much good.

Bennett said that if the hearing was held, Walker and Larry Zimmerman, a University of South Dakota professor, would have to give testimony. Zimmerman headed the group of University of South Dakota students who did the final survey of the Mill Creek site.

Giving testimony could be detrimental to Walker and Zimmerman because they are involved in archeology, and know the state archeology officials.

Bennett also said the hearing could be detrimental to Cherokee County, because archeologists may not want to work for the county again for fear of running into problems.

The last survey of the site was estimated to cost about $12,000. However, Walker said the work was completed ahead of schedule, and will probably cost between $5,000 and $7,000.



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