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Monday, May 2, 2016

Times Gone By

Friday, November 23, 2012

100 years ago

(Photo)
First Garfield School - This is a 1903 picture of the first Garfield School located on Willow Street on the same grounds that the second Garfield School was built. According to the information on the back of this photograph, the first school was built in 1884.
Yesterday at the tabernacle was different from all preceding days. It was announced that everybody and everything would give way to the young people and the prediction was entirely fulfilled.

In the morning the various Sunday schools went in a body from their churches to the rink, where Dr. Jordan preached a sermon directed to young persons in their "teens." The grown folks had their service at the same hour at the M. E. Church. Rev. Mack preached the sermon with all the characteristic energy of the Christian pastor, and at the close one man professed conversion.

In the afternoon the young people again took possession of the rink to listen to an address on "Backbone."

The stormy weather of last evening did not deter the people from attendance for the rink was well filled for the third time at 7:30, a notably large proportion of those present being men. The sermon of the evening was on Heb. 2:3, "How shall we escape if we neglect so great salvation." Dr. Jordan preached with all earnestness and a deep impression was made upon his hearers.

This coming week promises to be the largest and best of the entire religious campaign. There will be no service tonight but on Tuesday night Mr. Jordan will deliver his lecture on "A Bachelor's Idea of An Ideal Home." His lecture of last Wednesday on "The Philosophy of A Mouse," was a stem-winder and exceedingly well received and this one no doubt will measure up to that one, in every particular. This will be free, and with no admission fee charged.

The cottage prayer meetings will be continued throughout the week. For tomorrow they will be held at the following homes at 9:30:

J. A. Morrell, 607 W. Main

E. C. Herrick, 801 W. Main

Chas. M. Bellman, 201 S. 7th

O A Lee, 509 N. 2nd

S Ramsden, 415 11th

D. W. McNeal, 723 W. Cherry

M. E. Tiggs, 318 Maple

W. E. Geiger, 222 W. Elm

S. C. Whitehouse, 617 Roosevelt

Mrs. Davenport, E. Cedar

W. H. Millard, 431 Euclid

The children's chorus will meet for practice this evening after school.

75 years ago

A spirit of camaraderie prevailed Thursday, Oct. 28, in Immaculate Conception church hall when 200 Cherokee county 4-H club boys and girls, their Farm Bureau leaders and members of the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce gathered for the fourth annual 4-H recognition banquet and program.

The church hall was filled almost to capacity as 4-H members were given special awards for outstanding work during the past year. A Halloween motif was used in table and room decorations.

Get Small Gifts

Lola Antisdel, Cherokee and Plymouth county home demonstration leader and head of girls' 4-H clubs; presented the following girls with small personal gifts: Nellie Mongan, Madeline and Margaret Nolan, Dorothy Mohror, Jeannette Hamman, Rose Melter, Betty Jo Gates, Helen Felton, Dorothy Mortensen, Betty Coombs, Nina Loucks Lucille Rupp, Charlene Ohlson, Betty Abels, Darlene Stanford. The gifts were in recognition for outstanding work in sewing projects, health activities, home work demonstrations, style designing, keeping record books and other accomplishments of 4-H objectives.

Four members of the boys' club organization were cited for medal awards for outstanding livestock work.

They were: Philip Peterson, Orville McDonald, Wilmer Lamont and Vernon Grauer. All the boys participated in baby beef, sheep and pig club projects.

Preceding serving of the banquet by women of the church, Mrs. L. M. Johns opened the program leading community singing and Miss Nina Hanson accompanied on the piano.

Milo J. Sauer, president of the Chamber of Commerce whose members yearly sponsor the program, welcomed the future farmers to the 1937 event.

Eleanor Blake, president of the Cherokee county girls' 4-H association responded, thanking the Chamber of Commerce on behalf of her organization and assuring members the program was eagerly anticipated each year by both the boys and girls in club work.

Count Agent C. H. Thompson introduced Philip Peterson who acted as master of ceremonies for the remainder of the meeting.

Peterson introduced nine club members who took part on the program.

50 years ago

Chamber of Commerce Honors County Four-H Boys, Girls At Recognition Banquet Thursday Night; 200 Are On Hand

Many Awards Presented For Outstanding Work Past Year; Milo J. Sauer, President of Chamber, Welcomes Group; Eleanor Blake Responds.

A spirit of camaraderie prevailed Thursday, Oct. 28, in Immaculate Conception church hall when 200 Cherokee county 4-H club boys and girls, their Farm Bureau leaders and members of the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce gathered for the fourth annual 4-H recognition banquet and program.

The church hall was filled almost to capacity as 4-H members were given special awards for outstanding work during the past year. A Halloween motif was used in table and room decorations.

Get Small Gifts

Lola Antisdel, Cherokee and Plymouth county home demonstration leader and head of girls' 4-H clubs; presented the following girls with small personal gifts: Nellie Mongan, Madeline and Margaret Nolan, Dorothy Mohror, Jeannette Hamman, Rose Melter, Betty Jo Gates, Helen Felton, Dorothy Mortensen, Betty Coombs, Nina Loucks Lucille Rupp, Charlene Ohlson, Betty Abels, Darlene Stanford. The gifts were in recognition for outstanding work in sewing projects, health activities, home work demonstrations, style designing, keeping record books and other accomplishments of 4-H objectives.

Four members of the boys' club organization were cited for medal awards for outstanding livestock work.

They were: Philip Peterson, Orville McDonald, Wilmer Lamont and Vernon Grauer. All the boys participated in baby beef, sheep and pig club projects.

Preceding serving of the banquet by women of the church, Mrs. L. M. Johns opened the program leading community singing and Miss Nina Hanson accompanied on the piano.

Milo J. Sauer, president of the Chamber of Commerce whose members yearly sponsor the program, welcomed the future farmers to the 1937 event.

Eleanor Blake, president of the Cherokee county girls' 4-H association responded, thanking the Chamber of Commerce on behalf of her organization and assuring members the program was eagerly anticipated each year by both the boys and girls in club work.

Count Agent C. H. Thompson introduced Philip Peterson who acted as master of ceremonies for the remainder of the meeting.

Peterson introduced nine club members who took part on the program.

25 years ago

Slowly but surely changes are starting to occur n the five communities selected as charter participants in the Main Street Iowa program.

Main Street Iowa is a newly created revitalization program which seeks to breathe new life into the down, but not out, downtown areas of Iowa cities.

With funding from the Iowa lottery, the program is designed to work with communities of populations between 5,000 and 50,000. Each year, five communities are selected as participants in the three-year Main Street assistance program.

In April 1986, the first five communities were selected: Burlington, Fort Madison, Grinnell, Keokuk and Oskaloosa.

"Each community has its own character and our aim is to build on the uniqueness of each," said Nanette Weber, coordinator of the Iowa Main Street program. "This philosophy of the program is to work with what's already in the community, to capitalize on existing assets."

Each of the communities employs a full-time project manager who coordinates and oversees the project. But Weber noted that the success of the project depends on the community support and unity. She stressed the importance of strong public-private partnerships. "You need the community as a whole working together," she said.

The project managers agreed with that fact, and quickly pointed out the dedication and motivation of the communities, Alcia Goehring, Burlington project manager, said, "Community enthusiasm has been at a steady level. I am amazed at the dedication of this community."

Project manager Matt Hussman said that the same is true of the community of Grinnell. "The spirit of volunteerism is great here," he said.

Main Street Iowa works in accordance with the program developed by the National Main Street Center in Washington, D.C. The Main Street approach involves four key elements which together form a balanced program for revitalization. The four elements are: organization, promotion, design and economic reconstruction.

At this time, all the communities have committees and task forces in each of the four areas. Though the groundwork is laid for various programs and activities, most of the project managers are focusing on planning and promotion. They are working to create awareness of their projects and change the images of the downtown areas.

Jim Ingle, project manager in Oskaloosa, said that his priorities are to change the attitudes of the people in the community who resent the change and also to get more people behind the effort.

"I understand how people are anxious to see viable results. I look at the empty buildings and wish they were full. I just hope that people will be patient," said Engle.

Andrea Nettermeyer, Keokuk project manager, echoed Engle's words. "People think that when they get a downtown project they are going to see changes right away. But a long-range effective program takes planning," said Nettermeyer.

Most of the communities are offering some type of design assistance program or low interest loan programs for downtown businesses making improvements on their buildings.

Also the communities are in the early stages of economic reconstruction. They are conducting building inventories and marketing analysis to determine what kind of businesses they have and what kind they need to recruit.



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