Editorial

That’s noose to me

Friday, June 26, 2020
Garage Door Pull

For at least eight months, most probably more, a garage door pull rope hung in Garage #4 at Talladega Super Speedway, a gigantic 2 2/3 mile track with seating for up to 175,000 fans and enough garage stalls for a mini-storage unit large enough to house a world hoarders’ convention. A city within a city where thousands of mobile NASCAR tenants come and go and the infield holds more campers than Colorado KOAs.

One of NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace’s crew members (as yet unidentified) reportedly found the rope in the stall designated for Bubba, and because Bubba is black, compared it to a noose, and notified NASCAR authorities. They immediately classified it as a hate crime, all exacerbated by today’s global civil rights “war” and calls for seismic change in whites’ persecution of blacks throughout history. The FBI was called in, sent 13 agents - one for every original colony - and discovered that it was not a noose, but actually a door pull rope that looked like a noose.

Was somebody (crew member, other driver, custodian, family, friend?) playing a cruel, thoughtless joke? Did Bubba do it himself or have someone do it to magnify blacks’ plight and that he is the lone black NASCAR driver as this racial equality, police brutality issues rage on? How did they know Bubba would be assigned the #4 garage? Did NASCAR and/or FBI just sweep this under the rug to end it, knowing that any and all heads would roll in today’s racially charged environment? Was it retaliation on the heels of NASCAR waving bye-bye to the Confederate Flag? Or is it just plain southern bigotry by some Billy Bob still harboring a grudge because they lost the Civil War and the Mason Dixon Line was drowned in the Ohio River?

A noose is a loop at the end of a rope in which the knot tightens under load. The knot can be used to secure a rope to a handle, post or pole, but only where the end is in a position that the loop can be passed over. Basically a slip knot, any Boy Scout, boatsman, outdoorsman, farmer, or cowboy could tie one in seconds, as could knitters, veterinarians, and zoo keepers.

At any other time, this incident already would have passed. But a black Bubba, in a white business, in a racially charged world can be a target or a martyr.

Or he took one for the team.

And that’s one tough knot to untie.

(Paul Struck)

Noose